Doing Surgeons The Right Way

Modern Neurosurgery Advancements Almost every advancement in modern day medicine is because a doctor has attempted to better the method in which he/she has done something in the past. This concept pertains very well to the practice of modern neurosurgery. It has undergone a dramatic evolution since its beginnings over 150 years ago. Today’s neurosurgeons have found ways to treat a variety of structural lesions which affect the deepest recesses of the brain and spinal cord. Doctors have found a way to minimize complications while manipulating some of the absolutely most delicate tissue in the human body, partly as a result of the intellect of powerful pioneer surgeons, but also due to dramatic technological advancements which have now been applied to this discipline. For example, a wonderful advancement has been the operating microscope which allows the physician to have superior visualization. Also, there has been an advancement in endovascular techniques which means that such things as aneurysms and other vascular lesions can be addressed through a catheter instead of having to rely on more invasive open brain surgery techniques. Also, since endoscopic surgery is now possible, surgeons can treat certain neurological conditions through minimally invasive corridors, which drastically reduces the patient’s recovery time. Recently, neurosurgery as a field has advanced through a technique where the surgeon applies a very concentrated lethal dose of radiation very accurately to an area of diseased tissue, all while minimizing the level of radiation that affects tissues as near by as millimeters away. This advancement is known as Stereotactic Radiation Therapy, or SRT. Delivering radiation to tissues in a much less accurate procedure has been around for many decades.
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When it comes to radiating a breast or lung tumor, there is very little consequence to exposing a few inches of surrounding unaffected tissue to radiation. This type of treatment cannot successfully be performed for neurological lesions because if one were to expose nearby tissue to radiation, the collateral damage could produce significant neurological deficits, leading to new unintended issues. The need to accurately deliver such high doses of radiation to such a specific location with millimeter accuracy has driven the innovations in modern imaging and computing techniques.
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The adaptation of these SRT techniques has allowed doctors to alter their treatment recommendations for those patients who would have previously been told that they would need open brain surgery. Thanks to SRT, some brain and spinal cord lesions which would have previously been too dangerous to treat are now able to be addressed. Such conditions which may now be addressed with this form of minimally invasive neurosurgery are benign and malignant brain tumors, vascular lesions, neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson’s, and even some pain syndromes such as Trigeminal Neuralgia.